direct cinema & cinema vertie

est. 1957 – 1970s

Two documentary styles, Direct and Cinéma Vérité, emerged in the late 1950s, shared a common goal of capturing reality in its most unfiltered form. Direct Cinema, pioneered in the United States, used lightweight equipment to observe events spontaneously, offering an untouched and authentic experience. Cinéma Vérité, originating in France, embraces a more subjective and participatory approach, acknowledging the filmmaker’s presence and allowing for interpretations.

Origins of Direct and Cinéma Vérité

The roots of Direct Cinema and Cinéma Vérité can be traced to a different cultural, technological and philosophical factors that characterized the 1950s and 1960s, in both United States and France. As traditional documentary filmmaking methods began to feel restrictive and detached from the evolving spirit of the decades, a desire for more immediate and authentic representations of reality fueled the emergence of these documentary movements.

Salesman (1969) by Maysles brothers
Salesman (1969) by Maysles brothers

Direct Cinema

Associated with American filmmakers in late 1950s and 1960s, Direct Cinema was a response to the limitations of traditional documentary filmmaking. It aimed to provide an untouched depiction of reality, employing lightweight, portable equipment that allowed filmmakers to be more agile and less obtrusive. The key doctrine was the minimal use of directorial intervention, aiming to present events as they naturally occurred.

 

Prominent figures include Albert and David Maysles with their work “Salesman” (1968), which documents the lives of door-to-door Bible salesmens. Also D. A. Pennebaker, with now popular documentary film, “Don’t Look Back” (1967) which follows Bob Dylan on his 1965 tour of the United Kingdom.

 

The filmmakers often used observational techniques, avoiding interviews, voiceovers and scripted scenes. The resulting films had a raw and objective quality, providing viewers with an unfiltered window into the worlds they depicted. However, this approach also faced criticism for its potential to intrude upon the privacy of subjects, and for the ethical considerations associated with documenting real-life events and people participating.

Dont Look Back (1967) by D.A. Pennebaker
Dont Look Back (1967) by D.A. Pennebaker

Cinéma Vérité

Cinéma Vérité, meaning “truthful cinema” in French, shares similarities with Direct Cinema but has its roots in the French documentary tradition. Unlike Direct, Cinéma Vérité allowed for a more subjective and introspective approach, acknowledging the presence of the filmmaker as both observant and participant, and the impact of the camera on the events being documented. This approach allowed for a deeper exploration of subjects, leading to a more intimate exploration of their lives.

 

Considered one of the founders of Cinéma Vérité, Jean Rouch in his work “Chronicle of a Summer” (1961), engaged with ordinary people on the streets of Paris, asking them existential questions about their lives. The film captured spontaneous moments, reflecting on the ethical and philosophical implications of documentary filmmaking. Chris Marker, a visionary film essayist, created the documentary “The Lovely Month of May” (1963), a snapshot of post-Algerian War Paris. Known for his innovative narrative techniques, Marker captured the city’s pulse through candid interviews, street scenes, and poetic narration, creating a timeless exploration of societal shifts and individual perspectives.

The Lovely Month of May (1963) by Chris Marker
The Lovely Month of May (1963) by Chris Marker

Legacy and influence

The Direct and Cinéma Vérité movements never came to an abrupt end, rather they evolved. Today, their impact is evident in the diversity of documentary filmmaking styles. Filmmakers draw inspiration from these movements while embracing a wide range of approaches, including investigative journalism and essay filmmaking.

 

The emphasis on authenticity, a shared commitment of both movements, remains a guiding principle in contemporary documentary storytelling. The technological innovations introduced by Direct and Cinéma Vérité have contributed to the democratization of filmmaking, while the advent of more affordable digital cameras democratized the filmmaking process, enabling a wider range of voices to continue expanding documentary landscape.

Chronicle of a Summer (1961) by Jean Rouch
Chronicle of a Summer (1961) by Jean Rouch

Please refer to the Listed Films for the recommended works associated with the film movement.